Geography as “Approaching Medieval Present-Time Literature in the Digital Age: Mapping Contemporary”

aroline Prud’Homme, postdoctoral scholar in French Paleography at the Newberry Library and candidate for assistant professor of medieval studies and digital humanities at Binghamton, will give a talk at 5 p.m. today, Wednesday, Jan. 28, in the IASH Conference Room, LN-1106. The campus is invited to attend.

Using the Flemish Urban Revolt as a case-study, this talk investigates the response of medieval authors to the world they live in and the contemporary social tensions they witness. Questions discussed include: How do medieval authors engage with the social issues of their time? How do they perceive and represent them? How can we use digital tools to map the spatial and relational landscape of this event? This talk offers an analysis of textual and visual representations of the revolt and examines the circulation of information in the Middle Ages.

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Geography as “The Interactive Bible: Fiction and Faith in the Bible historiale”

Jeanette Patterson, lecturer in French at the University of Virginia and candidate for assistant professor of medieval studies and digital humanities at Binghamton, will give a talk at 5 p.m. today, Tuesday, Jan. 27, in the IASH Conference Room, LN-1106. The campus is invited to attend.

In the medieval vernaculars, the traditional authority of biblical history mingles with the new, the possible, the might have been. Guyart des Moulins’s Bible historiale is no exception.

Patterson will discuss how the translator’s, scribes’ and bookmakers’ collective interventions to make the Bible French create a customized space for readers to inhabit and explore, drawing upon the narrative habits of imaginative literature, and will consider what digital humanities can bring to bear on our understanding of the immersive, interactive reading experience invited by the Bible historiale and of medieval textualities.

Affiliated with the Material and Visual Worlds Transdisciplinary Areas of Excellence.

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Geography as “Cultural Politics in the Lives of Cuthbert”

Joey McMullen, postdoctoral fellow in the Medieval Studies Department at Harvard University and candidate for assistant professor of medieval studies and digital humanities at Binghamton, will give a talk today, Friday, Jan. 23, in the IASH Conference Room, LN-1106. The campus is invited to attend.

Around the year 721, Bede curiously rewrote a “Life of Cuthbert” which had been written only 15 years prior. While there have been many arguments as to why Bede would have done this to make the “Life” more international, to depict Cuthbert through a different model of sanctity or to respond to a tense ecclesiastical environment, an additional rationale from the framework of cultural geography would be to revise the ecclesiastical landscape, as set out by the author of the earlier “Anonymous“Life.”

McMullen argues that the anonymous author followed a common Irish practice of propagandistically claiming lands, territories and monasteries for Lindisfarne and that, in response, Bede removed many of these place-names and firmly relocated Cuthbert to his own diocese.

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Ben Franklin’s autobiography is the January Book of the Month

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Mémoires de la vie privée de Benjamin Franklin, écrits par lui-meme et adressés à son fils, suivis d’un précis historique de sa vie politique, et de plusieurs pièces relatives à ce père de la liberté.  Benjamin Franklin. 1791. Paris: Chez Buisson Librarie. 

Call number:  E 302.6. F7 F7 1791.  The C. Moss McLean Collection.

In 1771 Benjamin Franklin began to write his autobiography in the form of letter to his son William Franklin, then Governor of New Jersey.  The work had to be put on hold with the commencement of the War of Independence, and was resumed 13 years later.  Although a copy of the manuscript was sent to ​​M. le Viellard, a friend of Franklin’s from Passy to translate, the autobiography was translated by Dr. Jacques Ghibelline.  Shortly after Franklin’s memoirs were published in France, they were translated back into English and then published in London in 1793, and later in the United States in 1794.  The book is divided into two parts, and according to one book editor, Part II or La Table des Memoires de B. Franklin, published in London in 1790, was not written by Franklin but by one of his countrymen.

The Binghamton University Libraries’ octavo volume is quarter bound in brown leather with brown paper covered boards and leather corners.  The spine has faux banding and originally ruled in gilt.  A leather label with the stamped title once was adhered to the spine.  This rare first edition is recognizable by the pagination errors found at the end of Part II: page 203 is followed by 360, 361, 62, and then 363, the last page.

To see the book, visit Special Collections which is located on the second floor of the Glenn G. Bartle Library off of the North Reading Room.  During the Winter Intersession, Special Collections is open only by appointment, but during the spring and fall semesters, the department is open to the public 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday – Friday.

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Special Collections Holiday/Intersession Hours

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Holiday/Intersession Hours for Special Collections

December 22, 2014 – January 5, 2015                   CLOSED

January 6 – 25, 2015                                                  BY APPOINTMENT ONLY – to schedule call (607) 777-4844

Have a safe and relaxing break everyone!!

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The Tilly Losch Collection: Downton Abbey as Seen Through the Archives

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Another installment of “An Occasional Series in Special Collections” will take place on Thursday, December 18, 2014 at 12:00 noon in the Huppe Room in Special Collections located in the Glenn Bartle Library.

In anticipation of the premier of Season 5 of the hit international series, Downton Abbey on January 4, 2015, Beth Kilmarx, Curator of Rare Books, will speak about the Tilly Losch Collection located in Special Collections. The title of her talk will be “The Tilly Losch Collection: Downton Abbey as See Through the Archives.”

This event is free and open to the public. Special Collections is located on the second floor of the Bartle Library. For more information, call (607) 777-4841.

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The 1964-1965 New York World’s Fair is Special Collections’ Featured Book for December 2014

s fair 3Binghamton University Special Collections has selected The 1964-1965 New York World’s Fair, in celebration of its 50th anniversary, as its featured book for December 2014.  Written by Bill Cotter and Bill Young, longtime members of the World’s Fair Collectors Society, the book captures the history of this event through vintage photographs.  The 1964-1965 New York World’s Fair, called “the Billion-dollar Fair” lived up to its reputation.  It was the largest international exhibition ever built in the United States with more than one hundred fifty pavilions and exhibits spread over six hundred forty acres.

With the cold war in full swing, the fair offered visitors a refreshingly positive view of the future, mirroring the official theme: Peace through Understanding. Guests could travel back in time through a display of full-sized dinosaurs, or look into the future where underwater hotels and flying cars were commonplace. They could enjoy Walt Disney’s popular shows, or study actual spacecraft flow in orbit. More than fifty-one million guests visited the fair before it closed forever in 1965.

The 1964-1965 New York World’s Fair is part of the Local History Collection.  To see the book visit Special Collections, located on the second floor of the Glenn G. Bartle Library off of the North Reading Room.  Special Collections is open to the public 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Monday – Friday.

Call number:  T786 1964.B1 C68 2004. The Local History Collection.

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Special Collections will be closed November 27 – November 30

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Just a reminder: Binghamton University Libraries Special Collections and University Archives will be closed Thursday, November 27 – Sunday, November 30. We will re-open on Monday, December 1, at 10:00 a.m.

Click here for a full list of library hours

Have a safe and happy Thanksgiving everyone!

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Michael Kosowski ’16 speaks about his exhibit “Some of These People”: Marking the Other in Soviet Russia”

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Michael Kosowski speaks about his exhibit “Some of These People” in the University Art Museum.

On Friday, November 21, 2014, Michael Kosowski welcomed BU Libraries staff members to his exhibit “Some of These People”: Marking the Other in Soviet Russia” on display in the University Art Museum.  The exhibit featured Soviet posters on loan from the Binghamton University Libraries Special Collections.

Michael spoke about creating and researching for the exhibit and the imagery and messages of propaganda  in Soviet posters.

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Michael speaks about his exhibit with BU Library staff members (l-r) Kathryn Kowalczik, Jean Green, Anthony Tersmette, and Laura Evans.

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University Archivist gives Newing College talk

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On Friday, November 21, University Archivist, Yvonne Deligato, spoke about Newing College history to members of the Binghamton University Scholars Program.  The presentation included a brief discussion about the inception of Binghamton University and explored the development of the Newing College residential community and its unique traditions, events and activities.  The presentation followed with questions from the members of the scholars program.

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