Opening reception: Libraries’ Miniature Book Exhibit

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Special Collections will host an opening event in celebration of this unique and diminutive exhibit from 4-5 p.m. Wednesday, March 11, in Special Collections, second floor, off of the North Reading Room, Glenn G. Bartle Library.

The miniature book collection consists of 116 books that spans four centuries from 1605 to 1991. Books on a variety of topics can be found in the collection that is rich in prose, poetry, philosophy and religious writings with titles ranging from the classics to the obscure. Authors represented in miniature include the humanists, the humorous and politicians such as Petrarch, Charles Dickens and George Washington.

All are welcome. For more information, contact Lisa Havtur via e-mail.

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Cornell historian to speak on slavery and capitalism

Edward E. Baptist, associate professor of history at Cornell University, will present “The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism” at 4 p.m. Thursday, March 5, in LN-1106, the IASH Conference Room. He is author of the award-winning Creating an Old South and most recently The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism. The talk is sponsored by the Department of History.

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CEMERS trip to the Cloisters and the Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies will host a bus trip to the Cloisters and the Islamic Galleries in the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Friday, March 13. A guided tour will be provided at both museums.

The cost is $30 for undergraduate and graduate students; $25 for declared MDVL majors/minors and $45 for faculty and staff. Pricing includes transportation, museum admission and tours.

Arrive promptly at 8:15 a.m. Buses will depart the Events Center parking lot at 8:45 a.m. and return to the Events Center parking lot at 10:30 p.m. Students must have a valid Binghamton University student ID card to board the bus.

All students, faculty and staff are welcome.

Deadline to sign up is today, Friday, Feb. 27! For more information or to sign up, visit the CEMERS office, LN-1129, call 607-777-2730 or contact Erin Stanley via e-mail.

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Former Professor of English John David Walker dies

John David Walker, 83, former professor of English, died at his home Feb. 24, 2015. He joined the faculty at Binghamton in the early 1960s, retiring in 1995 after 35 years. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Abilene Christian University, a master’s degree from the University of Texas, Austin, and his PhD specializing in 18th-century English literature from the University of Florida, Gainesville. Following his retirement, he participated in six of the University’s London semester-abroad programs.

Read more here

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Professor Emeritus Wolfgang Kappe dies

Wolfgang Paul Kappe, 84, professor emeritus of mathematics, died Friday, February 20, 2015.

He completed Abitur in 1947 and enrolled at the Technische Universität in West Berlin then at the Humboldt Universität in East Berlin, where he pursued studies in mathematics. In 1959, he enrolled at the Universität Frankfurt and relocated to the Mathematical Research Institute at Oberwolfach as administrator, completing his doctorate in 1961. He and his wife emigrated to the U.S. in 1963. In 1968, they moved to Vestal, to join the mathematics faculty at Binghamton, where they were instrumental in developing the PhD program and where Wolfgang served as graduate director for many years.

An algebraist working in group theory, with major contributions to this area, Kappe retired in 2000, but kept contact with the department by attending the algebra seminar on a regular basis.

Read more here

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Writer/Director Marc Lawrence ’81 calls his new film a “love letter to Binghamton”

Marc Lawrence '81, left, and Hugh Grant answer questions from the audience following a special screening of the movie "The Rewrite." Photo by Jonathan Cohen.

Marc Lawrence ’81, left, and Hugh Grant answer questions from the audience following a special screening of the movie “The Rewrite.”
Photo by Jonathan Cohen.

Binghamton pride was out in force Sunday afternoon as 1,200 people viewed a special screening of “The Rewrite,” starring Hugh Grant and what writer/director Marc Lawrence ’81 calls his “love letter to Binghamton.”

If you were to ask anyone in the audience, you’d hear that the movie is a hit and Lawrence and Grant are a match made in heaven, but Binghamton was the star of the film. That became apparent every time a scene from the campus filled the screen and applause filled the Osterhout Concert Theater.

Listening to the pair’s self-deprecating responses to audience questions following the screening gave a clear message that Lawrence and Grant are close friends who work well together – and like to laugh.

How was this movie different than the other three you’ve done together?

Lawrence: “We had no money. There are film hubs around the country, and Binghamton is not one of them, so if we were to shoot up here we would have to bring the entire crew – 150 people for about six weeks and that costs more than shooting the film around New York City.”

Grant: “It’s sad we couldn’t have filmed more of it here.”

Read more here 

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Miniature Book Exhibit in Special Collections

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By definition, a miniature book is one that measures 10 centimeters or less in height. The Libraries’ Miniature Book Collection consists of 116 books that spans four centuries from 1605 to 1991. Due to their size, age and/or rarity, miniature books are housed in Special Collections.

Often made with the thinnest paper, and printed with the smallest type, this collection consists of elaborately decorated bindings, simple paper wrapped covers, and books with wooden boards. Books on a variety of topics can be found in the collection, a collection that is rich in prose, poetry, philosophy, and religious writings with titles ranging from the classics (La divinia commedia) to the obscure (Napoleon: poeme). Authors represented in miniature include the humanists, the humorous, and the politicians such as Petrarch, Charles Dickens, and George Washington.

The Miniature Book Collection exhibit will be on display throughout the Spring 2015 semester in Special Collections located on the second floor [off of the North Reading Room] of the Glenn G. Bartle Library.

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Over 25,000 early English books released into the public domain

Since January 2015 over 25,000 early English texts from 1473-1700 have been released online to members of the public under the CC0 Public Domain Dedication through the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership (EEBO-TCP). Since 2000, the university libraries of Michigan and Oxford and ProQuest have been working together in this initiative to create electronic text versions of early printed books from ProQuest’s Early English Books Online, Gale Cengage’s Eighteenth Century Collections Online, and Readex’s Evans Early American Imprints.

While these texts were previously only available to users of academic libraries participating in the partnership, at the end of the first phase of EEBO-TCP the current 25,000 texts have now been released into the public domain. They include highlights such as first printed editions of Shakespeare, Chaucer, and Milton, but also a wide variety of lesser known texts on topics ranging from sword fighting to witchcraft and gardening manuals. Users can not only browse and read through the text of these early English books, but also search through the entire corpus (which consists of two million pages and nearly a billion words). Searching for keywords and themes is possible as well because the text has been encoded with Extensible Markup Language (XML). An additional 40,000 texts will be released into the public domain by 2020.

See more here

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Geography as “Approaching Medieval Present-Time Literature in the Digital Age: Mapping Contemporary”

aroline Prud’Homme, postdoctoral scholar in French Paleography at the Newberry Library and candidate for assistant professor of medieval studies and digital humanities at Binghamton, will give a talk at 5 p.m. today, Wednesday, Jan. 28, in the IASH Conference Room, LN-1106. The campus is invited to attend.

Using the Flemish Urban Revolt as a case-study, this talk investigates the response of medieval authors to the world they live in and the contemporary social tensions they witness. Questions discussed include: How do medieval authors engage with the social issues of their time? How do they perceive and represent them? How can we use digital tools to map the spatial and relational landscape of this event? This talk offers an analysis of textual and visual representations of the revolt and examines the circulation of information in the Middle Ages.

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Geography as “The Interactive Bible: Fiction and Faith in the Bible historiale”

Jeanette Patterson, lecturer in French at the University of Virginia and candidate for assistant professor of medieval studies and digital humanities at Binghamton, will give a talk at 5 p.m. today, Tuesday, Jan. 27, in the IASH Conference Room, LN-1106. The campus is invited to attend.

In the medieval vernaculars, the traditional authority of biblical history mingles with the new, the possible, the might have been. Guyart des Moulins’s Bible historiale is no exception.

Patterson will discuss how the translator’s, scribes’ and bookmakers’ collective interventions to make the Bible French create a customized space for readers to inhabit and explore, drawing upon the narrative habits of imaginative literature, and will consider what digital humanities can bring to bear on our understanding of the immersive, interactive reading experience invited by the Bible historiale and of medieval textualities.

Affiliated with the Material and Visual Worlds Transdisciplinary Areas of Excellence.

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