Immigration, Citizenship and the Dream Act: Who are the Americans of the Future?

Come and learn about the challenges facing immigrants to the U.S. and the perspective of the “Dream Act” as the most popular legislative initiative to address immigration.

• Why are certain immigrants granted a path to citizenship and not others?
• Who is being denied access to citizenship and for what reasons?
• How can you become engaged in work with immigrant communities?

Join David Campbell, associate professor and chair of public administration, for a discussion from 6-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 12, in UU-102.

Panelists will include:
• Aja Martinez, assistant professor of English
• Lisbeth Pereyra – MPA student
• Stephen Ruszczyk – PhD student, community activist

A Q & A session with panelists will follow. Pizza will be served!

For more information, go online.

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Public Lecture: What Role for the State in Development?

Fred Henricks, Fulbright Senior Research Scholar and former dean of humanities at Rhodes University, South Africa, will speak about “What Role for the State in Development? The Case of the Public Investment Corporation in South Africa.” Henricks is also co-director of the African Humanities Program of the American Council of Learned Societies. This talk will be held at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 13, in UUW-324.

The lecture will address the current consequences of the changes in the pension fund system of workers in the public sector during the dying days of apartheid from pay-as-you-go to fully funded. It questions the appropriateness of the resultant social policies of the democratic government in the face of the huge development challenges of ongoing racialized poverty, inequality and unemployment.

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What are you doing for International Education Week?



he Binghamton University Globalistas (BUGs) are gathering a list of campus events for International Education Week, to be held Nov.17-21. The BUGs hope that you will join in celebrating the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. Your group or department is encouraged to plan a workshop, lecture, performance or other event with an international focus that week or close to IEW. The BUGs will help promote your activity. Send an e-mail to BUGs member Linda Torricelli, including the event title, date, time, location and brief description of no more than three sentences, by Wednesday, Nov. 5.

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VizCult talk to focus on art commemorating ties between France and Siam

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The Department of Art History invites the campus to another talk in the Harpur College Speaker Series in Visual Culture. Meredith Martin, associate professor at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, will speak at 5:15 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 29, in FA-218, on “Imperial Reflections: Art, Diplomacy and Exchange between France and Siam, 1680s through 1860s.” The talk is co-sponsored by the Department of Asian and Asian-American Studies and the University Art Museum. Go online for the abstract and for more information about VizCult.

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Prisoners University Project topic of discussion Oct. 27

Distinguished Puerto Rican historian Fernando Picó will present a talk on his latest initiative, “Prisoners University Project, 1990-2002″ at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 27, in UU-111.

Picó, who recently retired from teaching at the University of Puerto Rico, is one of the leading historians of Puerto Rico. He has written classic books on peasants, coffee production, slavery, prisons and the U.S. invasion of 1898, among other topics, as well as textbooks and a children’s book. He continues to be an active scholar and will speak on some of his more recent work on imprisonment. A Jesuit, he received his PhD at Johns Hopkins and is a past president of the Association of Caribbean Historians.

The talk is sponsored by the Latin American and Caribbean Area Studies Program and co-sponsored by the Sociology Department. It is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Reynaldo Ortiz-Minaya via e-mail.

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Harpur Cinema film showing this weekend: Wadjda

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Harpur Cinema features an appearance by visiting filmmaker Haifaa Al Mansour and a showing of her feature debut, “Wadjda,” (98 min.) at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 24, and Sunday, Oct. 26, in LH-6. Waad Mohammed portrays 10-year-old Wadjda, who wants a beautiful green bicycle so she can beat her friend Abdullah in a race. When Wadjda’s mother refuses permission to buy the bike, Wadjda decides raise the money herself by entering a competition that requires her to memorize and recite verses from the Koran. Haifaa Al Monsour is the first female Saudi director, and though her work is considered controversial, “Wadjda” and her earlier documentary “Women Without Shadows” have encouraged discussions about women’s issues in the Saudi kingdom. “Wadjda” has been screened around the world and won best new film at the 2012 Venice Film Festival. Admission is $4. For more information, call 607-777-4998.

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Huntington archivist finds historic piece of China’s largest book

Pages from section 10,270 of the Yongle Encyclopedia, 1562-1567, recently discovered among the stacks at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino. (The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens).

Pages from section 10,270 of the Yongle Encyclopedia, 1562-1567, recently discovered among the stacks at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino. (The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens).

The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens announced Thursday that it has portions of a rare and important Chinese manuscript called the Yongle Encyclopedia — with 11,095 volumes, the largest book ever written in China.

The book was commissioned by the Yongle Emperor of the Ming Dynasty in 1403 in an attempt to gather in one place a broad range of Chinese knowledge, including astronomy, geography, medicine, religion, technology and art.

In 1562, years after the Yongle Emperor’s death, the Jiajing Emperor commissioned 109 scribes to transcribe the entire encyclopedia as a backup copy. It took them five years to complete the work.

“That was the only copy made,” Yang said. “Eventually the original copy disappeared, and there is lots of speculation about what happened.”

No conclusive evidence of its fate ever emerged.

Read more here

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Feast around the world

Join Broome RAs and the Office of International Programs for an informative and casual conversation on study-abroad opportunities at Binghamton University. Don’t forget to bring your appetite; the event features foods from different cultures!

Thursday, October 23, 2014, 6:00-7:00 p.m., Broome Hall Great Room

Sponsored by: Newing College – Broome Hall
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Call for Papers! Authority and Materiality in the Italian Songbook

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Send abstracts and brief CVs by December 1, 2014 to cemers@binghamton.edu. Inquiries may be directed to Professors Olivia Holmes (oholmes@binghamton.edu) or Paul Schleuse (schleuse@binghamton.edu).

Supported by grants from the Material and Visual Worlds Transdisiplinary Area of Excellence of Binghamton University and the SUNY Conversations in the Disciplines program for “Intercampus Scholarly Conferences.”

For more information see http://conferences.cemers.info

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Following Political Pressure, Citizen-Led Rural Libraries Shut Down in China

Citizen-run libraries forced to shut down. Chinese social media image via China Digital Times.

Citizen-run libraries forced to shut down. Chinese social media image via China Digital Times.

China’s rural areas don’t receive the same education resources that the country’s wealthier urban centers do. This gap is a widely acknowledged problem, and many organizations have been established to improve the facilities in rural China and ensure that the students there aren’t left behind.

However, Chinese authorities don’t exactly welcome citizen-led initiatives with open arms, and recently an independent library project called China Rural Library (CRL) was forced to close due to political pressure.

CRL announced the closure of its library project on Sept. 18, 2014, on popular microblogging website Sina Weibo and published an open letter explaining the pressure they faced. The letter went viral on Chinese social media and was later censored by the authorities. Independent news website China Digital Times published a copy of the letter on Google Plus.

Read more here

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